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Newsletter February 2019

Previous Newsletter     January 2019

Next meeting Thursday, February 10, 2019.

7:30pm, Blair Field Clubhouse.   (Maybe...)

To everyone out there: 

Do you have any stories or photos of your interesting adventures? Or mis-adventures?

I will be happy if you could share in the next newsletters! 

Thanks! 

Cam    [email protected]

 
You call that Winter?
 
Not too bad in Kamloops, even though I saw minus 24 last week in Aberdeen, I know it won't last.  If you want to see real Winter,  go work with Paul at Bathurst Inlet. He was called last week to go fill in as Camp Manager for two weeks at the MLA Camp. He is the one with the brown coveralls on the left.

The temperature has been around minus 35 since he got there last week, normal for the place. Paul knew what to expect, as he was part of the crew that started that camp last year.
 

 
He flew to Yellowknife on Monday, and was scheduled to transfer to an ATR-72 operated by Summit Air for the next leg to Bathurst Inlet, a distance of 350 miles. But he had to sit on the ground while they were looking into engine problems, so he made it to camp only on Thursday. You definitely don't want to fly over the Arctic with an iffy engine! A forced landing over that area would not end well, as shown by the latest crash https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/air-tindi-flight-update-1.4999758 
 
Summit Air operates a fleet of some 20 aircraft, including Dornier 228, De Havilland Dash-8, DHC-6 Twin Otters, British Aerospace ATR-72, and Short SC.7 Skyvans. In all his years in the Arctic, Paul flew in most of them. (But not as PIC!)
 

The ATR 72
 
In a way, I am kind of jealous, wishing I could still do that stuff, go back to work for a few weeks now and then. But I must say that by the time I retired from Highland Valley in 2007, those ten-hour days were starting to take their toll. And those winters when I worked along the Alaska Highways until 1980 are really not on my list of things I miss. Certainly not that minus 52 Fahrenheit in Fort Nelson back around 1974!
 
To see the MLA webcam  try this http://lw-app.com/view/mla-airstrip  and click on Air Strip Webcam.
 
To see more webcams from the north, try http://lw-app.com/
 

The Dash-7 that Paul flew from MLA to Yellowknife.
 

From Dan Thomas

 

Fuel Systems for Homebuilts

 

Fuel system design and construction has been a major factor in accidents involving homebuilt airplanes, often on the first flight. I will try to address some of the more common mistakes that lead to such accidents.

 

First, the Canadian Aviation Regulations are an excellent source of information. CAR Standard 523 lays out the requirements for type-certified aircraft being manufactured in Canada. It's an extensive collection of standards that should be studied by anyone designing a homebuilt, even though they're not mandatory for homebuilts, because they contain much that will keep you out of trouble. As has been said by others, "Most rules are written in blood." We don't need to make the same deadly mistakes others did earlier.

 

Engines need a steady and adequate supply of clean fuel. Failure to provide one of those things is going to result in power loss.

 

Some builders have used cheaper hardware-store tubing for fuel. Don't do that. Gasoline attacks many polymers, sometimes quickly but more often slowly, and sometimes the damage isn't visible. Hose lining can deteriorate and crumble and the debris plugs the line. Or it starts leaking gasoline in flight, with the appalling hazard of inflight fire. Automotive fuel injection hose is much better and not that expensive. Fuel lines aft of the firewall should be aluminum, typically 5052-O. Copper can work-harden with vibration and bending, and will crack. Rubber or plastic eventually deteriorate and are easily pinched or cut. Rubber aft of the firewall should be limited to short lengths where relative movement might occur. Lines need to be well-supported and kept clear of anything that might damage them. Don't kink the tubing while bending it.

 

Fuel tanks come in many forms, but whatever they are made of, they need to resist the chemicals in gasoline and be able to withstand at least some crash forces. The ethanol in Mogas can attack some resins. Tanks need to be well-supported so they don't come loose or move around in flight. The fuel outlet should be a little above the bottom of the tank to discourage water or dirt from getting into the system, and a finger strainer should be installed in the outlet to prevent blockage by some simple thing like a bug or a leaf or bit of rag. There needs to be a quick-drain valve provided at the lowest point (with the airplane in ground attitude). Many airplanes have had accidents due to accumulated water and other contaminants in the tanks when drains were not provided, and in fact some certified aircraft left the factories with plugs in those drain ports. Later Service bulletins or Airworthiness Directives were required to correct that. The dumbest things we learn the hard way...

 

Some homebuilders have manufactured tanks of aluminum and used sloshing sealer to seal them. This was a common practice many years ago, but some aircraft had fuel system failures when the sealer started peeling off the inside of the tank and plugged the outlet. The sloshing sealer was originally intended for sealing seaplane floats, and now you might see warnings on the container against using it for fuel tanks. Manufacturers often use a sealant such as PRC or Proseal for internal tank seam sealing. Much more expensive and harder to apply, but much safer.

 

Fuel fillers need to be electrically grounded to the airframe. They need to have a good seal on the cap to prevent siphoning of the fuel or water entry. Flush fuel caps are especially prone to letting in rainwater or snowmelt.

 

Never use teflon tape or RTV silicone for sealing fuel system fittings. Never. Ever. These things are known to get into the system and cause trouble. RTV has an especially nasty reputation for that. A recent fatal RV crash investigation in the U.S. found chunks of RTV in the fuel system, blocking it. Manufacturers sometimes recommend a specific brand or part number of a teflon-based goop such as Loctite 567 or 592, or a hydraulic sealant. I prefer EZ-Turn Lube, formerly known as Fuel-Lube, a fuel-proof grease made for lubricating fuel valves. It doesn't harden with age to make disassembly difficult. Whatever you use, keep it off the first couple of threads of the fitting to avoid having it extruding into the system. When you disassemble fittings, make sure the sealant residue is all cleaned out of the threads.

 

Fuel system venting has been a common point of failure. If the system doesn't properly allow air into the tank, fuel eventually stops flowing out of it. A recent U.S. ultralight crash was caused by the pilot installing a non-vented cap, and the tank had no other venting. Some vented caps on top of the wing can, under the right conditions in flight, reduce the air pressure in the tank enough to hold the fuel back. Aircraft caps are often designed to achieve static pressure, or ram pressure, inside the cap so suction doesn't happen. A tractor fuel cap might not do that so well. You also have to determine what effect the strong relative wind is going to do to vents anywhere else, too: could it cause suction or siphoning of the fuel?

 

Vents need to be bug-resistant. They need to keep rain out. And if you have tanks with interconnected outlets such as found in an airplane that has a fuel selector with a "Both" position, the tank vents need to be interconnected as well. CAR 523.975 addresses that. If we think about it, and imagine an airplane with two tanks and each having a separate vent, and one of those vents provides just a bit more pressure to its tank in flight, what will happen? The tank with more pressure will drain first and if the pressure differential between the tanks is large enough, it might prevent any fuel flowing from the lower-pressure tank. If the differential gets a bit bigger, fuel from the high-pressure side is pushed through the system into the low-pressure tank and out its vent, losing a lot of fuel overboard. This is why high-wing Cessnas have one vent that feeds the left tank, and a line across the top to the right tank, to keep the tank pressures equal. Some older airplanes had a vent on each wing, but the tank vent spaces were still interconnected. The Glastar kitplane originally had separate fuel vents for each tank, and a simple teed-together fuel connection just before the shutoff valve, and differential vent pressures created uneven fuel flow. There was no interconnecting vent line between the tanks. I finished one of those airplanes, did some flying in it, and eventually installed a vent interconnection between the tanks to stop that issue.

 

If there is a header tank, it needs to be vented back to whatever tank the fuel is coming from to the header. Many years ago an Aerosport Quail crashed after takeoff because the builder had installed a header tank with its own vent, and in flight the header vent built enough pressure to push the fuel back up into the main tank (whose vent generated a lower pressure), the header ran dry, and the engine quit. And if the header's vent had generated a lower pressure than the main tank, it would have sucked all the main's fuel overboard through the vent.

 

Why don't low-wing airplanes have a "Both" position on their tank selector? Because the engine has a pump to pull fuel from the tanks, since we can't use gravity flow there, and if one tank runs dry, the pump will suck air from that tank instead of fuel from the other. If you take a glass of water and put a straw in it, and another straw beside it, and put both straws in your mouth and suck, how much  water will you get? None. The air from the straw outside the glass prevents building any suction in your mouth to lift the water.

 

Every system needs some means of shutting off the fuel flow in case of fire or forced  landing, or for servicing the engine side of the system, and that valve must not be on the engine side of the firewall. Its control must be easily accessible to the pilot. Every system needs a fuel filter between the shutoff and engine that will trap water and debris and allow for draining them off, since water is not known for its combustibility and, due to its surface tension, can actually stop fuel flow through carburetor metering jets. Dirt tends to stop fuel flow when it gets into things it has no business being in. We used to call these filters gascolators but now they're more commonly known as fuel strainers. They have a fine screen in them and a sump to allow water to settle out. They need to hold three or four ounces of fuel to adequately provide for water separation. They need to be easily serviceable for cleaning; you wouldn't believe how often I have found strainers almost impossible to disassemble because they haven't been opened in years, perhaps because it was too much hassle. As if safety is too much hassle, huh? What about the screen in there? Stuff can plug it. It needs cleaning.

 

Aircraft carburetors and fuel injector controls also have small, very fine screens that need occasional cleaning. Their screens are fine enough that water will not want to pass through them if they're wet with fuel. You should see, by now, that clean fuel is taken seriously. A finger strainer in the tank, the screen in the fuel strainer, and the screen in the carb or injector control, all progressively finer. The injector manifold has yet another screen in it, but it's not serviceable except by overhaulers. It shouldn't have anything in it if all the others are inspected and maintained.

 

Fuel flow, for a gravity-feed system, must be at least 150% of the maximum fuel flow the engine needs at full power in the most adverse aircraft attitude. That means, for most of us, a steep Vx climb attitude. Most homebuilders will put the minimum fuel in the tank (maybe less than a quarter tank), find a steep spot on the airport, or dig a hole for the tail, and get the nose well up, then disconnect the fuel line at the carb inlet and see how long it takes to run a couple of gallons into a container, with fuel running out of the hose held at the level of the carb inlet. Don't lower the hose, as that will increase head pressure and increase the flow and give a false result. Doing some arithmetic will find out if the flow meets the rule. For a system where the fuel is pumped to the engine, the flow needs to be at least 125% of the max fuel consumption.

 

Low fuel flows are dangerous, of course. Fuel lines that are too small or have kinks in them, valves or strainers that are too small, or less-than-adequate head pressure, are usually at fault. If the tank isn't high enough above the carb for decent gravity flow, you have a problem. Air bubbles that get into lines when the fuel in the tank sloshes around in flight can sometimes restrict the flow, too. Cessna had a problem with that long ago, and that's why you see a placard in some older 172s that says "switch to single-tank operation upon reaching 5000 feet ASL." Air would get into the line when the fuel sloshed around, and a bubble would try to float back up the vertical section of the line behind the aft doorpost but the down-flowing fuel would hold it there, and so the fuel had to squeeze around it, which slowed the fuel flow. With single-tank operation, the flow was faster and the bubble was carried down through the system into the carb bowl and it escaped harmlessly out the bowl vent. A kit was offered to install a section of line that had a second line welded to it, and that line ran forward and upward to tee into the vent crossover. Bubbles were vented back to the tank that way. Later models had the modified lines in them. The 5000' ASL thing was due to the increased risk of this problem as atmospheric pressure on the fuel decreased, and formation of larger bubbles was more likely.

 

Vapour lock. Oh, boy, a lot of myths and misinformation around this one. Basically, a liquid's boiling point goes down as atmospheric pressure on it is reduced. You can get water to boil at room temperature in a bell jar with a vacuum pump pulling the air out of it. Gasoline will do the same thing but at even lower temperatures, since its initial boiling point is already low. Gasoline can start to boil at temps as low as 35C as its lighter elements start to evaporate. Its boiling point drops even further as an engine pumps sucks on it, and as altitude puts less atmospheric pressure on it. Putting a liquid under pressure raises its boiling point, which is why cars have pressure caps on their radiators, and why fuel boost pumps push on the fuel.

 

In the airplane, vapour lock can occur as the pressure on the fuel goes down and its temperature rises. Think of the low-wing airplane, with the engine-driven fuel pump pulling on the fuel to lift it from the tank to the pump. The pressure on the fuel falls, bringing it closer to the boiling point. Add some heat: maybe the section of line under the cowling gets hot from engine heat, or the daytime temperature has the entire tankful of fuel pretty warm, and that fuel might start boiling and giving off vapours. That's all the pump and the rest of the engine get: vapours, but the engine's fuel system is designed to process liquid. The engine quits. Or is hard to start after shutting down. Boost pumps, located near the lowest point in the fuel system, are therefore seen in low-wing airplanes and in many high-wing ships. Simpler high-wing airplanes with wing tanks often need only the gravity flow, and the weight of fuel increases its pressure and therefore its boiling point enough that vapour lock is rare. Insulating fuel lines in the engine compartment can help, too. Fire sleeves works well for that.

 

Cars used to have problems with vapour lock on hot days. They don't anymore. The fuel pump used to be on the engine; now it's in the tank and the fuel is pushed all the way to the engine under pressure, and there's often a return system back to the tank that keeps the fuel in the lines cooler.

 

This is the section of CAR 523 that deals with fuel systems. It starts at CAR 523.951 and you can scroll to  523.1051. http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/regserv/cars/part5-standards-523-sub-e-274.htm#523_951

 

If you read that and think about why the rules say what they do, you can learn a lot.

From Jan Nademlejnsky

216. Flying above Beautiful Kamloops NW Ridge, Jan 21, 2019

The second sunny day required to take your bird up. I was following Kamloops North Ridge east and west. With practically now ground wind, it was blowing around 70 km/h at 6,500'. The flight was very enjoyable and uneventful until I noticed that my seat belt was unbuckled (again). The buckle opens by just lifting its latch. I have camera around the neck and resting practically on that seat belt buckle. Most likely, I accidently pull the buckle latch when grabbing the camera with my clumsy winter glove. Regardless, I had to buckle up again in the air. While doing it, the control bar suddenly and unexpectedly surged (moved) forward, into, I think, stall position. If you don't have patience to watch whole movie then skip to 3 min and watch it in normal and slow motion. I would like to hear from you experts some explanation, what really happened there.

Video   Pictures  Video Snaps

 

215. Flying to Chase Village over Beautiful Mountains, Jan 20, 2019

It was beautiful, crispy day at about -2C to -6C. I was flying east from Kamloops over the Harper Mountain Ski Hill and over beautiful valleys and hills to Chase village. The Chase is "coastal" village on Little Shuswap Lake. It was very nice flight over mountains and clouds. That area is very picturesque. I landed from about 3,000' to runway at idle speed (~2,000 RPM) until touch down. It was another first in this trike. It went very well.

Video   Pictures  Video Snaps

 

North Ridge above Tranquille Creek

North Ridge above Tranquille Creek

Niskonlith Lake and Little Shuswap Lake in background

 

Chase BC Village and Little Shuswap Lake

 

Chase BC Village and Little Shuswap Lake

 

Leaving Chase for Kamloops

 

Monte Creek area

From Dan Berwin

Flying under the clouds, heading west from Kamloops. Six-Mile Hill ahead.

 

Looking better with more altitude.

 

Heading south from Cache Creek.

 

The lookout on Cornwall Mountain.

 

New in the BuyAndSell
in the last month.

(Or new asking prices.)

 

Certified 0-235-C1   Offers

Certified 0-235-C1 engine with Log book. Engine is dismantled for rebuild. All parts there including Bendix mags and alternator. Log states 2026 TT 751 STOH.  No reasonable offer refused – must go.  Jamie  250 319-7343  [email protected]

190208

Andreasson BA-4B     Now $25,000. CDN

VINTAGE SPORTS CAR CONSIDERED IN TRADE.

OR TRADE FOR A GLIDER AND TRAILER.

The Andreasson BA-4B is a Swedish-designed sport biplane that dates from the mid-1960s.

This BA-4B is an excellent example of the type. It features all-metal construction, superior build craftsmanship, a 0-timed engine, terrific panel and a removable full canopy. It is built for small to medium sized pilots.     The builder, Gerry Theroux, is a retired aircraft maintenance engineer, and his experience with structures and systems on large airliners shows in the build quality and attention to detail that this BA-4B demonstrates.

Aircraft Features :

Lycoming 0-235-L2C 118 hp, O SMOH. Overhaul completed in 2015, engine properly preserved in a heated garage or hangar since then.  Will need proper break-in sequence completed. 2000 hour TBO.  Dual P-Mags allow variable and always optimal ignition timing. This translates to exceptional fuel economy and reliability. The ability to use automotive spark plugs saves even more monnics EZ-Pilot single axis (roll) autopilot. The EZ-Pilot is slaved to the included Garmin 296 GPS and will intercept and hold a course tht selects, or operate autonomously to any heading the pilot selects. It can slave to any GPS featuring standard NMEA data output

Panel mounted Garmin 296 GPS.   An MGL comm radio Mode C transponder. Standard ASI, altimeter, VSL, fuel gauge, and tachometer. Quad gauge for oil pressure and temp, CHT and EGT.  Full electrics with proper wiring and circuit breakers.   Electric pitch trim with electronic position indicator.  Flaperons, which will also work with the EZ pilot.  Adjustable rudder pedals. Cabin heat and cabin vent cooling.

4 full-span ailerons for exceptional roll control.  Fighter plane-style stick grip with switches for comm, trim and autopilot 5-point harness.  55 litre fuel tank (14.5 US gal).  Spring steel landing gear, dual brakes and 6.00 x 5 tires.  Full swivel tail wheel.  Wingtip and strobe lights.  Full plans and a set of claw tie-downs

Additionally, the engine needs the initial ground run break-in, plus the standard in-flight break-in to seat the rings and to stabilize oil consumption.

The BA-4B is currently registered as an ultralight aircraft and has not yet flown. As an ultralight, it does not require the standard amateur-built restrictions such as staying within only 25 NM of the home airport for the first 25 hours of flight. The pilot has a lot more freedom to explore the airplane at his or her discretion.

The airplane weighs about 700 lbs empty, and as noted, it will best fit small to medium sized pilots. The rudder pedals are adjustable via turnbuckles, and there is some room for adjustment in the seat

This airplane will have outstanding performance with an excellent power-to- weight ratio, terrific climb and roll rates, and an estimated cruise speed near 150 mph! You won’t find that in other ultralight aircraft.

See this Wikipedia link for the design’s complete history: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andreasson_BA-4B

See a BA-4B in action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3lnNit3q1g

If you feel the BA-4B might be right for you, please contact 403-931-1645 [email protected]

Firewall Forward is worth more than asking price!

190114-BS678

Refurbished 1983 Quicksilver MX    Now $7,000.

35 hp Rotax 377. 3.5 gph – rebuilt 2014. TTSO 65 hrs.  Spare Rotax 503 single ignition, 23 hrs TTSO ( unverified ).  52x32 Tennessee prop.  Fiberglass pod and wheel pants.  New updated 6” wheels and Azusa aluminum mags.  New Teleflex cable, and spoileron cables.  New updated drum style brakes and cables.  New battery.  New complete sail set and storage covers.  New fuel tank and seat tank 9.5 gallon capacity.  Strobes.  Ceramic coated exhaust system 2017.  BRS type aircraft recovery parachute system ( professionally repacked 2016 ).  Too much to list.

Instruments include :  MGL E3 engine monitoring system.  Instrument panel ASI.  New Hall wind speed indicator.  Tachometer.  Altimeter.  Compass.  

This is not a project, it is very clean, ready to fly and flown regularly. The Quicksilver MX line of ultralights is one of the most enjoyable and simple to fly on the market ( currently ). If you're looking for your first ultralight or just wanting an inexpensive aircraft to fly, this is the one. Just plane fun. Located @ CYQZ. Quesnel BC  [email protected]

190207-BS719

MicroAir T2000SFL Transponder  $1,000.

(Picture found on the Web.)

With AmeriKing AK 350 encoder, Plug and play wiring harness, Coax kit.  Stub antenna is not included, but it is readily available.  User Manual is here.

I removed it from my previous trike because the new owner did not want to pay for it (he did not need it). There is everything what you need except the small antenna, which is readily available. It works perfectly. It is very important part of your flying safety, because you are seen by ATC where you are and how high. You could turn elevation reporting off, just in case you want to do something crazy. I heard ATC reporting my position at up to 70 km. You just plug it and it is ready to go.

This transponder is listed at Aircraft Spruce Canada at $3,568. plus all taxes.

Jan at [email protected]  778-470-0505 Kamloops.    http://freedom-of-flying.ca/

190204BS771

Several floats available: 

EDO 1400 LIKE NEW RECENT RBLD • $7,500. Excellent tight with data plates Champ streamline wires but Rebel struts.

Also: Lotus 1260 with Rans S7 rigging $2,500.

Excellent like new PG 1400 with Rans S7 rigging $9,000.

1300 Aeroflotteur These are an amazing lightweight float see this take off: https://drive.google.com/file/d/12whdajVL9rffJ31fMbsGKiDb0QSUP1Ep/view   $8,000.

And finally Murphy 1500 never used and excellent, water rudders, hatches but no rigging $10,000. All are straight floats

Contact Peter Cowan 705-761-3370       [email protected]

SUPER STOL 170 (AB) w 2425 FLOATS 

Asking $40,000.

(Also have a Rans S7 short tail project).  

Proven with 20 years service then down for rebuild and updating. Very little left to do. Fly this spring in a really excellent float plane or back country on wheels. Horton STOL, Wing-X extensions, CS prop or Catto 3-blade on low-time topped 0-360. One of a kind steel tube, fabric fuselage but all Cessna wings, tail, 180 gear, manual flaps, and Edo 2425 floats .

Plane registered Amateur Built in Canada and can be exported to US, It has been done! Cndn is $40,000. or $32,000. without floats. Full details and pictures Contact Peter Cowan, [email protected]  705-761-3370

190204BS770

Federal wheel skis.    $4,500.

 

 

 

 

Air Glide 2200. Teflon bottom.  Call Denis  780-826-3684 or email [email protected]

190203BS769

Rare 1959 C150.    Reduced to $15,000.

In great condition. 11100TT, 1621 SMOH TBO 2000.  King KY97 Com, GTX 32A Transponder, New 406 ELT,  Standard panel. Push Button Starter. Pitot Static recently done, next 2020. Burn rate 5.5GPH.  Logs since new avail. Great time builder, Well maintained (Commercial and Private). Cowl and side covers avail. New rubber.  Rated: exterior 7/10, interior 7/10. Fresh Annual June 2018  Call Bill 604-819-3620 or email [email protected]

180910-BS735

Miscellaneous avionics  Still a few things left

DM C63-3/A VHF-FM antenna 138-174 MHz   $100. for under fuselage attachment for marine radio or FM ground stations

Also:

Telex 62800.001 Microphone for GA $25.00   

Garmin GA27C MXC Remote GPS Antenna  $25.00

ICOM IC-20 cigarette lighter cable for ICOM IC A6/A24/A25  $25. each 

ICOM OPC499 headset adapter for ICOM handheld radios $ offers   SOLD!

Payment with cash, e-transfer or Pay Pal prior to shipping

Frank Satre   Lac La Hache, BC   250-706-7751   [email protected]

190102BS764

Misc. aircraft parts.  Offers.

Seat rails for Cessna.

Dash for 170A

 

Odds and ends

 

Child seat for Cessna

Open to offers on any of the items...  Call Elmer at 250-789-3140  or email at    [email protected]

190123BS768

Wag Aero project   Price reduced

Wag Aero 2+2 project (PA-14 copy) 4 place, $2,000. OBO, Bearhawk wings, $3,000. OBO,     Nick 604 828 4366, [email protected]        

1809047-BS731

                 1961 C-182D  C-FTGS  $49,995. Cdn firm.

         7465 TTSN  1924 SMOH  0 SPOH  Ex military A/C

         820 Hrs since bottom inspection ( new parts incl bearings)

         Compressions 68,64,72,64,78,76  Recent cylinder work.

         Horton stall kit and  B / M gap seal kit installed.

         All accessories inspected 2019.

         KY96A digital Com, GTX 327 digital Txpdr, encoder,  4 place icom

         Overhauled prop with sale . New ELT with sale.

         Many new parts. Extensive annual 2019    0 snags on Aircraft

         After sales support and upgrades  by AME/Owner at reduced rates.

         No major damage history, no corrosioon issues.

         Ext 7/10  int 6/10  Good glass.  Hooker harnesses.

         A/C located at Oliver BC.  Delivery at cost.  Shayne  250-688-1760     [email protected]

190121BS767

Grumman AA5-B carpets.   $250.

Will fill all Grumman AA5-B. Never used FAA certified fire resistant carpets. Made by Excel Aviation in Indiana. Will not fit AG5B models.     250-819-1001   [email protected] 

190121BS766

2015 Epic 3000 LS Kit,    NOW $52K

It is a cross between a Citabria and a Super-Cub, kit was built by Nick Smith (BBI aviation, Smith Cubs) It has a Citabria body with cub wings and landing gear, 0 time 150HP engine,  1600 LBS gross, flaps, dual doors, float fittings, skylight, almost all the Fabric work done, have the prop, needs instruments and exhaust and about 200 hrs to complete, pre cover inspection done,  over $57K invested in the kit, engine and parts and about $15K worth of labor so far, will sell  for $55K. I need to buy an excavator to clean up the mess the wildfire left behind on my place, no time or money for the airplane project. located In Telegraph Creek, BC.  Contact Russell Sampson at  [email protected] or 250-235-3295

 

181201BS756

Challenger 2     NOW $25,500.

Exceptional Challenger 2, 2010, built in the home-built class, many additional features. Includes: Mixture control, carb heat, Engine information system, ballistic chute, under seat storage, in-flight adjustable 3 blade IVO prop, new hydraulic brake system, integrated PTT control stick, 64 liter aluminum fuel tank, fuel sump system, advanced throttle quadrant, 582 Bluehead Rotax motor with 182 hours, always hangared, flown regularly, fresh inspection by Lakeland Air ready to go. Comes with full set of Turbulence covers, wheel pants and standard set of tires. Currently on Tundra tires. Very fast edition of Challenger. Cruises easily at 82mph and can cruise at 90mph if desired. To build approx. $60k. Priced reasonably at $27,700. Call Rod Giles 250 428 5209. Serious inquiries only.  [email protected]

190114BS704

Wanted:  RV-4 WING COVERS

Contact:   George Murray      [email protected]  403-931-1645

190114

Andreasson BA-4B     $18,000. CDN

VINTAGE SPORTS CAR CONSIDERED IN TRADE.

OR TRADE FOR A GLIDER AND TRAILER.

The Andreasson BA-4B is a Swedish-designed sport biplane that dates from the mid-1960s.

This BA-4B is an excellent example of the type. It features all-metal construction, superior build craftsmanship, a 0-timed engine, terrific panel and a removable full canopy. It is built for small to medium sized pilots.     The builder, Gerry Theroux, is a retired aircraft maintenance engineer, and his experience with structures and systems on large airliners shows in the build quality and attention to detail that this BA-4B demonstrates.

Aircraft Features :

Lycoming 0-235-L2C 118 hp, O SMOH. Overhaul completed in 2015, engine properly preserved in a heated garage or hangar since then.  Will need proper break-in sequence completed. 2000 hour TBO.  Dual P-Mags allow variable and always optimal ignition timing. This translates to exceptional fuel economy and reliability. The ability to use automotive spark plugs saves even more monnics EZ-Pilot single axis (roll) autopilot. The EZ-Pilot is slaved to the included Garmin 296 GPS and will intercept and hold a course tht selects, or operate autonomously to any heading the pilot selects. It can slave to any GPS featuring standard NMEA data output

Panel mounted Garmin 296 GPS.   An MGL comm radio Mode C transponder. Standard ASI, altimeter, VSL, fuel gauge, and tachometer. Quad gauge for oil pressure and temp, CHT and EGT.  Full electrics with proper wiring and circuit breakers.   Electric pitch trim with electronic position indicator.  Flaperons, which will also work with the EZ pilot.  Adjustable rudder pedals. Cabin heat and cabin vent cooling.

4 full-span ailerons for exceptional roll control.  Fighter plane-style stick grip with switches for comm, trim and autopilot 5-point harness.  55 litre fuel tank (14.5 US gal).  Spring steel landing gear, dual brakes and 6.00 x 5 tires.  Full swivel tail wheel.  Wingtip and strobe lights.  Full plans and a set of claw tie-downs

Additionally, the engine needs the initial ground run break-in, plus the standard in-flight break-in to seat the rings and to stabilize oil consumption.

The BA-4B is currently registered as an ultralight aircraft and has not yet flown. As an ultralight, it does not require the standard amateur-built restrictions such as staying within only 25 NM of the home airport for the first 25 hours of flight. The pilot has a lot more freedom to explore the airplane at his or her discretion.

The airplane weighs about 700 lbs empty, and as noted, it will best fit small to medium sized pilots. The rudder pedals are adjustable via turnbuckles, and there is some room for adjustment in the seat

This airplane will have outstanding performance with an excellent power-to- weight ratio, terrific climb and roll rates, and an estimated cruise speed near 150 mph! You won’t find that in other ultralight aircraft.

See this Wikipedia link for the design’s complete history: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andreasson_BA-4B

See a BA-4B in action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3lnNit3q1g

If you feel the BA-4B might be right for you, please contact 403-931-1645 [email protected]

Firewall Forward is worth more than asking price!

190114-BS678

Lazair 2-seat ultralight Changes   Now asking $9,000.

Lazair 2 seat ultralight aircraft, great fun way to fly, enjoy the open air feeling.  40’ wing span x 14’ overall length x 6’ tall. With 2 – 26 HP KFM electric start motor, all new fuel lines, new plugs, decarbon cylinders, 2 new props 36”x 15 pitch, 2 fuel tank total 12 gallon, dual electric fuel pump, gauges.  Halls airspeed indicator, battery voltage, cylinder head temp, altimeter, vertical speed, compass, turn coordinator, new seats.  Bungee landing gear with 6’ wide stance gear.    Will deliver within 4 hours flight time(400 KM)    Located at Chilliwack, BC   Ron Pankonin 604 991 0522 [email protected] 

190114-BS680

1946 Taylorcraft project.    NOW $2,500.

This great little aircraft has not flown for some time and needs someone who is dedicated to restoring her to her former glory. Our Museum space is very limited, so it has been priced to move. Please use the email in the photo if you have any interest. Located in Langley BC. Canadian Museum of flight. 

181004BS741

Piper Cherokee 140 (160HP) $42,500.

DOM:1966 Lycoming 160hp. Total hours since new: 2,830.   SMOH: 1,382.   Top OH: 16hrs, complete tear down. Prop: 16hrs Since new. Annual completed: Nov 30,2018 In great shape, runs perfect, flies like a dream. Immaculately maintained. Located @ CFX2   Pieter: 403-606-2087     [email protected]

190108BS765

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  Newsletter Editor: Cam at  [email protected]